Baltimore Orioles Offense – A Position by Position Review

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Jul 2, 2014; Baltimore, MD, USA; Baltimore Orioles celebrate in the infield after defeating the Texas Rangers 6-4 at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. Mandatory Credit: Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

The 2014 season for the Baltimore Orioles is now just over 75% completed. How does the offensive production of the O’s of 2014 compare to the 2013 version when considering the two seasons position by position?

In the offseason there was much discussion about how to improve the lineup and address a variety of needs. We may recall that there were three primary improvements that needed to be made: second base, left field, and designated hitter.

Additionally it was hoped that most of the other six positions would either repeat with a similar performance as recently completed in 2013, or return to a better previous level of former years.

Right field was a position where hopes were high to see a revival and return to customarily high output numbers. This could also be said also with the catcher position as well, given declining batting averages year to year.

First base was known to be almost impossible to repeat, and along with third base there were hopes that both would not fall off too terribly far from 2013.

The Orioles would be pleased to see the level of offensive output to remain relatively the same from both the shortstop and center field positions.

So let’s take a position by position review by stepping through the following pages and looking at each of the nine positions in the batting order. We’ll recall the numbers from 2013, look at the performance through three-fourths of the season, and then calculate each on the following scale (with a cumulative total and summary page at the end):  

+3 – Massively Improved

+2 – Definitely Improved

+1 – Marginally Improved

0 – Relatively the Same

-1 – Marginally Worse

-2 – Definitely Worse

-3 – Massively Worse

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